Prufrock's Wargaming Blog

Prufrock's Wargaming Blog

Friday, September 10, 2021

New Approaches

Knowing that there is no chance of my managing to paint up all of the armies in all of the eras I would like to, I have been exploring an alternative approach. While I have a decent collection of ancients armies, I have nothing for the horse and musket era, and little chance of having time or spare money in the near future to be able to remedy that.

So what is a person to do?

Well, I've decided to experiment with craft products and boardgames. 

I'm thinking of using wooden or cork sticks, circles and squares to represent various troop types, and either Battle Cry or Commands & Colors: Ancients boards and tiles for the battlefields.

To test whether the look would work I played the 1st Bull Run scenario from Battle Cry using these projected stand-ins.



Just for my own reference, here is the key to what each of the pieces represents.




I don't think it looked too bad, and it was easy enough to differentiate between the two sides. Obviously, for games which have more troop types and in which troop quality is represented, I will need to make some changes, but my initial reaction is that it seems worth pursuing. 

I have already picked up from Wargame Vault Sean Chick's first game in his Hollandspiele-published Horse and Musket series, and we'll see how it goes from there.

15 comments:

  1. What you've come across for materials works great for linear combat. What's cool is you can make labels and print them and then place them on with elmers glue (white glue in case elmers isn't a product on your side of the world). You can even paint each side a generic color. A friend of mine and I did that and it really looks cool, especially if you use a map style background. Just like the history books. Good luck with project.

    Cheers
    Kevin

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  2. I've been down the counter route myself and I think it's very sensible. You could paint the blocks but then you're back to painting. Labels, as Kevin suggested, are the way to go. If you use self-adhesive labels you won't even have to glue them.

    Richard

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  3. I created ACW armies for Battlecry using mdf stands with unit id (NATO symbols) printed out and glued onto the stands. The strength is indicated by 3 painted stands under the ID stand, stacked. As a miniatures player, I'm totally turned off by the bad plastic figures that come with the game.

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  4. A sensible solution. Have you read David’s posts on his block armies on A Wargaming Odyssey?

    http://awargamingodyssey.blogspot.com/2021/08/block-changes-or-why-didnt-i-think-of.html?m=1

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  5. I can’t remember the name of the bloke who does them (google will no doubt help), but he started a range of 6mm MDF for H&M and ranked up they look good. For this kind of project, I am guessing they would be no dearer than buying in blocks or any other crafting solution.

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  6. Found Him!
    http://www.commission-figurines.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Commission-Catalogue-2021.pdf

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  7. I've assembled armies for ECW based on matchsticks. The bases are rather thick and I would recommend thinner ones. Here is a battle report with pictures of them: https://wargamingeverything.home.blog/2019/12/06/for-king-parliament-campaign-august-1643/

    Another idea is to buy larger wooden blocks or sticks and paint them up like in the old PC game Waterloo: https://www.squakenet.com/game/waterloo/

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  8. My first thought would be generic Red and blue armies with 6mm or 10 mm figures, or the Perry's plastic Travel Battle figures (8mm). The blocks/shapes will work just fine too. Then there are the old System 7 Cardboard "Napoleonics".

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  9. Junior General has free top down and side view figures that you can print and glue to counters for almost every period.

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  11. I quite like the "Kriegsspiele" look of painted wooden pieces, and it has the added benefit of allowing more accurate depictions of unit/ground scale and especially unit depth, which is pretty much impossible with miniatures at anything higher than a skirmish level.

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  12. An interesting project. Painting a large collection of miniatures from scratch is a significant undertaking.

    We use Volley & Bayonet in a variety of scales, but mostly 6mm. However, one of my regular opponents is not a keen painter but has produced a couple of Seven Years Wars armies in 2mm. They have come up well. I believe he is working on Napoleonic armies now.

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  13. Wow, thanks all, some great comments and suggestions. I'll look forward to working through them over the next couple of nights! Thanks again, Aaron

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  14. Great suggestions above! Lot's of fodder for your future games, Aaron.

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